Tooth eruption

Baby tooth eruption

Tooth eruption is the process by which a tooth goes through the gums and becomes visible in the mouth. The set of teeth is intended to cut and grind down food during meals. The eruption of the teeth is a process that begins when a child is still a baby, and continues on through childhood and the teenage years. A person will have two sets of teeth: baby teeth and later on permanent teeth.

Primary teeth

The following chart shows when the primary teeth erupt. They are also called baby teeth or decidious teeth. It is important to note that the eruption time varies from one child to another.

Primary teeth
Upper Teeth Eruption Time Age of Loss of Tooth
Central Incisor 7 to 12 months 6 to 8 years old
Lateral Incisor 9 to 13 months 7 to 8 years old
Cuspid (canine) 16 to 22 months 10 to 12 years old
First Molar 13 to 19 months 9 to 11 years old
Second Molar 25 to 33 months 10 to 12 years old
 
Lower Teeth Eruption Time Age of Loss of Tooth
Central Incisor 6 to 10 months 6 to 8 years old
Lateral Incisor 7 to 16 months 7 to 8 years old
Cuspid 16 to 23 months 9 to 12 years old
First Molar 13 to 19 months 9 to 11 years old
Second Molar 20 to 31 months 10 to 12 years old

Primary Teeth

Some facts to consider

  • Generally, tooth eruption occurs earlier for girls than for boys.
  • Teeth erupt two by two, one on each side.
  • Primary teeth are smaller and whiter than permanent teeth.
  • Around the ages of two to three years old, primary teeth should all have erupted.

Signs and symptoms

There are signs and symptoms that can help recognize the eruption of teeth for babies:

  • Irritation of the mouth.
  • The baby placing objects or fingers in the mouth and biting on them.
  • An increase of saliva in the mouth.
  • Loss of appetite.
  • Inflamed gums.
  • General agitation.
  • Redness on the cheek near the area where a tooth is erupting.

The tooth eruption process should not cause fever, vomiting, or diarrhoea. If these problems appear, it is important to consult a doctor.

To relieve the pain during tooth eruption:

  • Use a clean finger to massage the gum.
  • Use an anaesthetic cream sold in pharmacies (such as Orajel).
  • Allow the baby to suck on a clean cloth moistened with cold water.

Permanent teeth

The following chart shows when the permanent teeth erupt. Some people also refer to them as adult teeth.

Permanent teeth
Upper Teeth Eruption Time
Central Incisor 7 to 8 years old
Lateral Incisor 8 to 9 years old
Cuspid (Canine) 11 to 12 years old
First Bicuspid (Premolar) 10 to 11 years old
Second Bicuspid (Premolar) 10 to 12 years old
First Molar 6 to 7 years old
Second Molar 12 to 13 years old
Third Molar (Wisdom Tooth) 17 to 21 years old
 
Lower Teeth Eruption Time
Central Incisor 6 to 7 years old
Lateral Incisor 7 to 8 years old
Cuspid (Canine) 9 to 10 years old
First Bicuspid (Premolar) 10 to 12 years old
Second Bicuspid (Premolar) 11 to 12 years old
First Molar 6 to 7 years old
Second Molar 11 to 13 years old
Third Molar (Wisdom Tooth) 17 to 21 years old

Permanent Teeth

References

  1. Tooth eruption (Wikipedia).
  2. Dental Health and Your Child's Teeth (WebMD).
  3. La dentition (Ma bouche en santé (Ordre des dentistes du Québec)).

The information above should be used as a reference only. Any medical decision should not be done before consulting a health care professional.

The masculine gender has been used without prejudice to make reading easier.


See Also